COMMUNICATION and SOCIAL INTERACTION DISORDER TRAINING FREE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT SECURITY FIRMS and OTHER PEACE OFFICERS

Posted July 22nd, 2016 by deborah.ross with No Comments

Dear Peace Officers:

We at San Diego Speech Therapy, Inc need to say THANK YOU for your service to the public. Your job is unpredictable, sometimes dangerous, and most certainly stressful. You must use a combination of your higher-order cognitive reasoning and judgement skills alongside your lower-order instinctual and “quick read” sensory-based skills to make decisions whether to act or not act in unfamiliar situations. You are relied upon by the public to take decisive action, often in a split second. We thank you for the work that you do for the greater good day in and day out. In order to meet the complex needs of the public, you must undergo regular training in skill sets such as communications, negotiations, handling of weapons and required equipment, to name just a few.

Do you also need training in identifying and working with individuals who have communication disorders and social interaction disorders? YES–by virtue of working with the public, you do. It is estimated that as many as 1 in 10 (TEN!) children and adults has one or more communication disorders in the US (according to the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders). This means that in your line of work, it is very likely you have encountered individuals with some form of communication disorder nearly every day you are interacting with the public. Did you identify them? Did you know how to change the way you interacted with them? It is NECESSARY for anyone who works with the public to be able to do both. Here are some real life situations:

Could the “drunk, erratic, staggering” person who was “shouting and using slurred speech” on the street turn out to be a person who has survived a stroke or has another type of neurological speech disorder (dysarthria or aphasia)?

Could the person who didn’t follow your order three times to “Put your hands where I can see them” have a hearing disorder?

Could the person who sat in the middle of the street rocking back and forth looking distressed while holding an undetermined “potentially dangerous object” have a social-interaction (developmental) or auditory comprehension disorder?

Maybe they COULD not do what you asked—especially when your demeanor was frightening them?

Please read this: http://www.ici.umn.edu/products/impact/133/prof4.html.

And remember this: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/florida-shot-unarmed-man-hands-face-charges-article-1.2720369

And please remember this: http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/02/01/boy-15-shot-dead-by-police-in-calumet-city/.

Individuals with communication disorders are among our most vulnerable citizens. Please, on their behalf, take time to READ about individuals who have communication disorders, and ASK questions of professionals who devote their lives to public understanding and communication skills development. Professionals such as Speech/Language Pathologists (SLP’s) specialize in evaluating and treating individuals who have communication issues. An essential component to this life’s work is training of family, caregivers, the public. We invite you to visit the trusted sites listed below under SOURCES, to learn more.

We at San Diego Speech Therapy are also your resource. As Speech/Language Pathologists, we can help you learn to identify and to respond appropriately to individuals with a variety of hearing, speech, language, cognitive-linguistic, developmental and behavioral diagnoses. Please let US serve you. www.sandiegospeechtherapy.com

Sources:

https://www.ada.gov/policeinfo.htm

https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/statistics/quick-statistics-voice-speech-language

https://medlineplus.gov/speechandcommunicationdisorders.html

https://www.ada.gov/policevideo/policebroadbandgallery.htm

http://www.thearc.org/NCCJD/resources/by-audience/law-enforcement

http://www.victimsofcrime.org/library/resource-directory-victims-with-disabilities/law-enforcement

http://www.asha.org/public/

http://www.disabilityrightsca.org/pubs/CM5101.pdf

5 Creative Ways to Use Toys For Speech and Language Enrichment

Posted June 19th, 2014 by deborah.ross with Comments Off on 5 Creative Ways to Use Toys For Speech and Language Enrichment

School’s out!  For Summah!  Little Sweet-Pea might need a bit of support over the break.  Here are 5 creative ways to use toys for speech and language enrichment for the youngest kiddos.

1.  PLAY! with toys.  Turn off the electronics.  The battery-powered.  The one-way interaction “toys”.  Get down on the floor with your little one and PLAY!  Kids’ imaginations are boundless.  Let them remind you how to PLAY!  See it through their eyes.  Everything is an adventure and nothing is pre-planned.

2.  Role-play is a generational favorite at nearly any age.  Have hard-hats and tools with blocks, markers, and boxes handy.  Have an apron, 4 simple “cooking” utensils and 3 “cooking” ingredients handy.  Before you know it, you might have a fantastic mud-pie or jello treat AND a table or platter to serve it all on. While playing, hold specific items next to your mouth as you say the name or the key sound you wish to highlight. The best way to have a child say something is to MODEL it, rather than REQUEST that he/she say it. So “spoon” while holding the spoon next to your mouth during the act of cooking is more likely to get the child’s response than “say spoon”.

3.  When you PLAY!, FOLLOW your child’s lead.  NARRATE what is happening and EXPAND on what he/she says.  “You are moving the chair next to the box.  When she says “table” and points to it, you say “we made a table!” and “sit down”.  She might repeat some or all of what you said.  Great!  When he stirs the pudding mix and reaches for the liquid you say “First we add the mixture, then we add the milk.”   He might repeat some or all of that.  Fantastic!  It’s not helpful to say “no, not like that”. or  “let me do it”.  We are not expecting little adults here.  The point is speech and language enrichment, not perfect pudding and upright furniture.

4.  Take TURNS.  This teaches a child that communication is a time for both LISTENING and SPEAKING.  Many many children struggle with this very basic skill.  Do your part in helping them see “it’s your sister’s turn”, or “when you are quiet, then I know it’s my turn”.  On the flip side, some kids don’t know that when YOU are quiet it signals their turn to speak.  Prompt them or MODEL what they could say.  Then PAUSE and see if they do!

5.  REPEAT.  Kids just soak up the repetition.  They love the same games, toys, songs, routines, role-play scenarios OVER and OVER.  Be patient.  Be open.  They are little sponges learning all they can and loving every minute of your quality attention and time. For some kids, repeating the same thing is the ONLY thing they want. Some kids need a little help branching out to enjoy other activities. If you have concerns about this or any other aspect of your child’s speech, language, social or play development be sure to speak with your pediatrician and ask for a Speech Evaluation. If he/she says “oh, let him/her grow out of it”, keep on asking until you get an evaluation. The evaluation is the ONLY way to fully address your concerns and with kids, time IS of the essence.

For more information, including help from one of our expert professionals CLICK HERE.

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