COMMUNICATION and SOCIAL INTERACTION DISORDER TRAINING FREE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT SECURITY FIRMS and OTHER PEACE OFFICERS

Posted July 22nd, 2016 by deborah.ross with No Comments

Dear Peace Officers:

We at San Diego Speech Therapy, Inc need to say THANK YOU for your service to the public. Your job is unpredictable, sometimes dangerous, and most certainly stressful. You must use a combination of your higher-order cognitive reasoning and judgement skills alongside your lower-order instinctual and “quick read” sensory-based skills to make decisions whether to act or not act in unfamiliar situations. You are relied upon by the public to take decisive action, often in a split second. We thank you for the work that you do for the greater good day in and day out. In order to meet the complex needs of the public, you must undergo regular training in skill sets such as communications, negotiations, handling of weapons and required equipment, to name just a few.

Do you also need training in identifying and working with individuals who have communication disorders and social interaction disorders? YES–by virtue of working with the public, you do. It is estimated that as many as 1 in 10 (TEN!) children and adults has one or more communication disorders in the US (according to the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders). This means that in your line of work, it is very likely you have encountered individuals with some form of communication disorder nearly every day you are interacting with the public. Did you identify them? Did you know how to change the way you interacted with them? It is NECESSARY for anyone who works with the public to be able to do both. Here are some real life situations:

Could the “drunk, erratic, staggering” person who was “shouting and using slurred speech” on the street turn out to be a person who has survived a stroke or has another type of neurological speech disorder (dysarthria or aphasia)?

Could the person who didn’t follow your order three times to “Put your hands where I can see them” have a hearing disorder?

Could the person who sat in the middle of the street rocking back and forth looking distressed while holding an undetermined “potentially dangerous object” have a social-interaction (developmental) or auditory comprehension disorder?

Maybe they COULD not do what you asked—especially when your demeanor was frightening them?

Please read this: http://www.ici.umn.edu/products/impact/133/prof4.html.

And remember this: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/florida-shot-unarmed-man-hands-face-charges-article-1.2720369

And please remember this: http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/02/01/boy-15-shot-dead-by-police-in-calumet-city/.

Individuals with communication disorders are among our most vulnerable citizens. Please, on their behalf, take time to READ about individuals who have communication disorders, and ASK questions of professionals who devote their lives to public understanding and communication skills development. Professionals such as Speech/Language Pathologists (SLP’s) specialize in evaluating and treating individuals who have communication issues. An essential component to this life’s work is training of family, caregivers, the public. We invite you to visit the trusted sites listed below under SOURCES, to learn more.

We at San Diego Speech Therapy are also your resource. As Speech/Language Pathologists, we can help you learn to identify and to respond appropriately to individuals with a variety of hearing, speech, language, cognitive-linguistic, developmental and behavioral diagnoses. Please let US serve you. www.sandiegospeechtherapy.com

Sources:

https://www.ada.gov/policeinfo.htm

https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/statistics/quick-statistics-voice-speech-language

https://medlineplus.gov/speechandcommunicationdisorders.html

https://www.ada.gov/policevideo/policebroadbandgallery.htm

http://www.thearc.org/NCCJD/resources/by-audience/law-enforcement

http://www.victimsofcrime.org/library/resource-directory-victims-with-disabilities/law-enforcement

http://www.asha.org/public/

http://www.disabilityrightsca.org/pubs/CM5101.pdf

What is Speech Pathology?

Posted April 29th, 2011 by deborah.ross with No Comments

Speech and Language Disorders Explained
A child’s communication is considered problematic when the child is noticeably behind his or her peers in the acquisition of speech and/or language skills. Sometimes a child will have greater receptive (understanding) than expressive (speaking) language skills, but this is not always the case. Speech and language disorders can affect the way children talk, understand, analyze or process information.

Speech Disorders
Speech disorders include the clarity, voice quality, and fluency of a child’s spoken words. Language disorders include a child’s ability to hold meaningful conversations, understand others, problem solve, read and comprehend, and express thoughts through spoken or written words. Speech disorders refer to difficulties producing speech sounds or problems with voice quality. They might be characterized by an interruption in the flow or rhythm of speech, such as stuttering, which is called dysfluency.

Voice or Language Disorders
People with voice disorders may have trouble with the way their voices sound. Speech disorders may be problems with the way sounds are formed, called articulation or phonological disorders, or they may be difficulties with the pitch, volume or quality of the voice. They may say “see” when they mean “ski” or they may have trouble using other sounds like “l” or “r”. Listeners may have trouble understanding what someone with a speech disorder is trying to say. A language disorder is an impairment in the ability to understand and/or use words in context, both verbally and nonverbally.

Characteristics of Language Disorders
Some characteristics of language disorders include improper use of words and their meanings, inability to express ideas, inappropriate grammatical patterns, reduced vocabulary and inability to follow directions. One or a combination of these characteristics may occur in children who are affected by language learning disabilities or developmental language delay. Children may hear or see a word but not be able to understand its meaning. They may have trouble getting others to understand what they are trying to communicate.

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